CANCELLED: "Dancing with Devils: Mask Traditions and Festivals in Latin America"

Image
Leonardo Carrizo
March 17, 2020
3:30PM - 5:30PM
Location
165 Thompson Library

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2020-03-17 15:30:00 2020-03-17 17:30:00 CANCELLED: "Dancing with Devils: Mask Traditions and Festivals in Latin America" THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED.    Carnival and Diablada festivals are among the most widely recognized celebrations in Latin America. A tradition of devil masks and characters can be found at these and other important cultural and religious festivals throughout the Americas, including Peru, Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, Mexico, and the Dominican Republic. Devil masks are used in rites, dances, and by performers as a means of visualizing transcendental aspects of different religious and cultural beliefs.   This exhibit presents a collection of existing and donated Latin American masks in the Center for Latin American Studies Andean and Amazonian Andean Cultural Artifact Collections, alongside photographs of a Diablada de Píllaro in the Ecuadorian province of Tungurahua taken by Leonardo Carrizo. The majority of masks on display were donated by OSU alumnus Mark Gordon and are accompanied by an adaptation of his 1987 original field study.     March 17th Acitivites: 3:30 pm: Reception, honoring Mark Gordon, visiting scholar and OSU alumnus 4:00 pm: Introduction by Mark Gordon 4:15 pm: Roundtable Discussion, featuring: ​Michelle Wibbelsman, Associate Professor, Latin American Indigenous Cultures Leonardo Carrizo, Photographer and Lecturer, Communications Dorry Noyes, Professor of English and Comparative Studies Lisa Voigt, Professor, Spanish & Portuguese Richard Fletcher, Associate Professor, Arts Administration, Education, and Policy     Visit their sister exhibit “Dancing with Devils: A Visual Narrative of La Diablada de Píllaro” curated by photographer Leonardo Carrizo on display at the Lakewood Public Library in Cleveland from March to August 2020. Photographer Leonardo Carrizo showcases photographs of the Diablada de Píllaro, a six day festival in the Ecuadorian province of Tungurahua. This exhibit documents the procession of a traditional partida (group) from the Tunguipamba community. The Diablada consist of several masked characters, most noticeable the diablos, wearing masks made of paper mache, animal horns, animal fangs and an assortment of decorations.   165 Thompson Library Center for Latin American Studies clas@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description
 
Carnival and Diablada festivals are among the most widely recognized celebrations in Latin America. A tradition of devil masks and characters can be found at these and other important cultural and religious festivals throughout the Americas, including Peru, Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, Mexico, and the Dominican Republic. Devil masks are used in rites, dances, and by performers as a means of visualizing transcendental aspects of different religious and cultural beliefs.
 
This exhibit presents a collection of existing and donated Latin American masks in the Center for Latin American Studies Andean and Amazonian Andean Cultural Artifact Collections, alongside photographs of a Diablada de Píllaro in the Ecuadorian province of Tungurahua taken by Leonardo Carrizo. The majority of masks on display were donated by OSU alumnus Mark Gordon and are accompanied by an adaptation of his 1987 original field study.
 
 

March 17th Acitivites:

  • 3:30 pm: Reception, honoring Mark Gordon, visiting scholar and OSU alumnus
  • 4:00 pm: Introduction by Mark Gordon
  • 4:15 pm: Roundtable Discussion, featuring:
 
 
Visit their sister exhibit “Dancing with Devils: A Visual Narrative of La Diablada de Píllaro” curated by photographer Leonardo Carrizo on display at the Lakewood Public Library in Cleveland from March to August 2020. Photographer Leonardo Carrizo showcases photographs of the Diablada de Píllaro, a six day festival in the Ecuadorian province of Tungurahua. This exhibit documents the procession of a traditional partida (group) from the Tunguipamba community. The Diablada consist of several masked characters, most noticeable the diablos, wearing masks made of paper mache, animal horns, animal fangs and an assortment of decorations.

 

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